Saturday, February 2, 2008

Young Performer Series: Juan-Salvador Carrasco

I have decided to feature some of the young talent out there in a series called "Young Performer Series" - I will try and put up at least one a week - so if you have any videos or recommendations please send me an email.

The inaugural series performer is Juan-Salvador Carrasco.

Bio:

Juan-Salvador Carrasco is the son of Mexican film director Salvador Carrasco and English violinist Andrea Sanderson. Juan-Salvador was born in Mexico City in 1994 and has been playing the cello since he was six years old. He currently lives in Santa Monica, California with his parents and two siblings, Sebastian and Cassandra. He attends The Mirman School for Gifted Children and studies cello at The Colburn School of Music with Ron Leonard, principal cellist of the Los Angeles Philharmonic for 25 years.

On March 11, 2007 Juan-Salvador (age 12) had his debut in Mexico City as a soloist playing Saint-Saens's Concerto for cello and orchestra with the Orquesta Sinfonica de Coyoacan conducted by Richard Markson.




As a result of this, Juan-Salvador was invited to appear on the nationally televised "Conversando con Cristina Pacheco," an hour-long interview combined with live cello performances.

Also in March 2007, Juan-Salvador performed Haydn's "Divertimento in D major (arr. Piatigorsky)" in a private audition for world-famous cellist Yo-Yo Ma. Seen here:


Juan-Salvador with Carlos Prieto (left) and Yo-Yo Ma (right).














Please feel free to leave comments - He actually wants some honest feedback.

*Update* A more recent video





9 comments:

HerrWagner said...

Juan-Salvador Carrasco is undeniably an impressive young talent. He has a tremendous skill decorated with a wonderful elegance, he offers much that is to be prized and appreciated. I believe, and do hope, that we will hear and see much more of this valuable, growing musician. One of the best new talents I have ever heard without a doubt.

Sarvenaz said...

The thing I find remarkable in these performances is their depth -- the cliche is that children often are technically brilliant but lack the emotional depth of older performers. That cliche is obviously defied here by the resonance of Juan-Salvador's playing. He clearly has a profound understanding of the music, not just the instrument.

Celli - IV said...

The quality of tone Juan-Salvador Carrasco brings from within his violoncello is beyond description. - The sound of music has finally reached utter perfection!

Anonymous said...

I don't mean to sound harsh, but of course this child is good! He has all the money to pursue his talent, all the connections to make it happen, and all he really has to do is practice. He has led a priviledged life and will continue to do so. I for one would love to hear about a kid that is just as good, but not from such a musically prestigious background. They are out there!

Anonymous said...

First af all, congrats dear Cello Geek for your Blog and for your Your Performer Series.
Thanks a lot for your job.
We are a parents group of young celliste here in Spain.
You can know more about us visiting www.chelistas.com
Juan Salvador has a tremendous talent. Please if you are thinking in visiting Spain, contact us. It would be a pleasure share one of our concerts with you.
Un abrazo Juan-Salvador.
Yours Sincerely
www.chelistas.com

Rich Rodriguez said...

Juan- Salvador asked me to pass on this message in regards to anonymous' comment:


Dear anonymous:

With all due respect, please do not jump to conclusions. I come from a quintessentially middle-class Mexican family, and you have no idea how hard my parents have worked and struggled every day of their lives to provide my siblings and me with an education. Far from having "all the money," my dad works two teaching jobs so we can pay the rent of our apartment in Los Angeles. I agree that I am privileged, but only because I have a loving family that believes in an ethic of hard work, not facile connections.

Respectfully yours,
Juan-Salvador Carrasco
(JuanSalvCarrasco@aol.com)

snwpnthr4 said...

aww salvador you're so famous XD
btw nice solo during orchestra today
i'll see you tomorrow i guess?
nice videos =)

violin accordion said...

music transcends class, and as you come from a middle class background of relative comfort, your playing and innate self-effacing sense of whatever music you play truly reveals the composer, maybe even more than someone from a poorer background. you are the only cellist that makes me feel i am listening to the greatest of the past such as fournier, piatigorsky, navarra. Where is the
wonderful, beat up old cello you played the Saint-saens on. this is the instrument for you until you can obtain a truly great instrument such as Tecchler, guarneri or guadagnini, testore. Please give us Muse and Poet soon.

violin accordion said...

music transcends class, and as you come from a middle class background of relative comfort, your playing and innate self-effacing sense of whatever music you play truly reveals the composer, maybe even more than someone from a poorer background. you are the only cellist that makes me feel i am listening to the greatest of the past such as fournier, piatigorsky, navarra. Where is the
wonderful, beat up old cello you played the Saint-saens on. this is the instrument for you until you can obtain a truly great instrument such as Tecchler, guarneri or guadagnini, testore. Please give us Muse and Poet soon.